Monday, August 5, 2013

Weekend Roundup

In addition to the sweet guest room and hallway action, this weekend was a fun little whirlwind of a visit. I thought I'd post a little photo wrap up of Sunday, because it was productive like crazy.

Hiking at the Redwood Regional Forest, which turns out
to be a 10-15 minute drive from our house.
How have we lived here so long without knowing this?
My mom taught me a new way to cut a
watermelon into cubes.
I accidentally bought a yellow watermelon.
But this is a much better way to cut it than my
method (cut like you're going to eat slices,
and then trim away the rind awkwardly).
We picked all of this from our garden
(plus a cucumber and 4 tomatoes).
Does anyone know what kind of beans those
stripey ones are? We thought we were growing
green beans. 
I reduced 4c of chicken stock down to a
seriously condensed, thick base.
And that's our cucumber in the background.
Oh, and my dad brought me this drum.
This is the bass drum from the set he bought
when he was 13 (his first with his own money).
(my dad was a professional drummer)
He showed me this "champagne glitter" drum
when I was a kid, and I decided it would be
mine someday. He brought it up this weekend,
and it'sjust as gorgeous as I remembered.
We're going to get a piece of glass and use it
as a coffee table in the entry-living-room we
have yet to finish.
So rad.

Photo roundup over :)

16 comments:

  1. Um, these photos are indeed all rad! I especially love the bass drum, its story, and what you're going to do with it.


    Do you like sweet relish & bread-and-butter pickles? If so, I have a recipe for pickled watermelon rind that I want to share with you.

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  2. Sweet relish & Bread and butter pickles are blasphemous, destroying the good names of true pickles everywhere!


    I am a snob for super sour, dilly, salty pickles. Anything else is sacrilege.

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  3. you should try traditional cuisine of Indonesia, wow it feels good ...

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  4. My dad has the same drum set in gold. =)

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  5. ok no problem

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  6. Those are cranberry beans, if it's not too late to chime in.

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  7. It's not too late! I thought that's what we might have on our hands...also called shelling beans?

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  8. Olá, Aí vem o empréstimo acessível que mudará sua vida para sempre, eu
    Mr. Mark Jerry certificado credor, eu ofereço empréstimo individual e
    pública setor precisa de ajuda financeira a baixa taxa de juros de 3%.
    Bad crédito aceito, estes Termos e Condições são muito simples e
    atencioso. Preencher e devolver os detalhes da aplicação Nome Completo:
    idade: país: endereço: Telefone: Valor do Empréstimo Necessário: Período
    de empréstimo: Contato e-mail: louisloanfirm@live.com Estou ansioso
    para ouvir de você para que continue. Com Atenciosamente, Marcar o Sr.
    louis abukari

    ReplyDelete
  9. Olá, Aí vem o empréstimo acessível que mudará sua vida para sempre, eu
    Mr. Mark Jerry certificado credor, eu ofereço empréstimo individual e
    pública setor precisa de ajuda financeira a baixa taxa de juros de 3%.
    Bad crédito aceito, estes Termos e Condições são muito simples e
    atencioso. Preencher e devolver os detalhes da aplicação Nome Completo:
    idade: país: endereço: Telefone: Valor do Empréstimo Necessário: Período
    de empréstimo: Contato e-mail: louisloanfirm@live.com Estou ansioso
    para ouvir de você para que continue. Com Atenciosamente, Marcar o Sr.
    louis abukari

    ReplyDelete
  10. Yep, cranberry beans are a type of shelling beans. Think of any dried bean you can buy in the store - they're like those, but the fresh version! Super delicious and cook waaaay faster.

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  11. Sweet. Thanks, Colleen! When I realized I couldn't really eat the fibrous pod, I shelled them and sauteed them in a little olive oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder and sprinkled them over a salad like nuts :)

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  12. Haven't heard of cranberry beans before, but they sure sound good!

    ReplyDelete